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Fancy Nancy Science Party

Page history last edited by Jane McManus 10 years, 9 months ago

Libraries are more than books. Some kids need a little direction to get the creative juices flowing. I gleaned the following from PUBYAC contributors. If you're a member check out the archives for 8-19-2011, and 10-25-2011, Fancy Nancy Science Party Compilation. Please add YOUR comments. Your colleagues would appreciate hearing what works, and what didn't!


Break the group into two areas: science crafts and science games.

 

Teen volunteers can run the craft area while you run the game area & switch the kids half way through the party.

 

In the craft area, the kids made windsocks and decorated science journals.  

  • WINDSOCKS—Made of crepe paper streamers (the kind used to decorate for parties) left over from other crafts. The kids paste pieces of streamer along the edge of a large sheet of construction paper and then paste the construction paper to form a tube with the streamers hanging down. A pipe cleaner is bent into a handle and scotch taped to the windsock.
  • SCIENCE JOURNALS--Before the party staple together the following inside a large piece of folded construction paper: a list of resources (science themed Fancy Nancy books, other books of science activities available in the collection, non-commercial websites), two "sparkly" science experiments involving crystals, and some lined paper for recording scientific notes. The kids then decorate the covers with crayons and whatever stickers and sparkles I could find in the storage closet.  
  • FOSSIL RUBBINGS--using plastic plates with fossil designs), sorted buttons, and play with tinker toys and kaleidoscopes.
  • STAR CONSTELLATIONS--The kids use star stickers and black construction paper to create star charts or their own constellations.
  • SPARKLE DOUGH--
    • Squeeze bottle
    • Tempera Paint
    • Flour
    • Salt
    • Water
      • 1. Mix equal parts flour, salt, and water in a bowl.
      • 2. Stir in some tempera paint.
      • 3. Place sparkle dough into a squeeze botle and squeeze the sparkly dough onto a piece of paper.
      • 4. Once the dough dries completely, you will see the sparkles. Sparkle dough pictures need to dry at least overnight.

 

  • CRYSTAL NEEDLES
    • Black paper
    • Large jar lid
    • 1 cup water
    • 4 Tablespoons Epsom salts
      • 1. Cut a piece of black paper to fit into the jar lid. Place the paper inside of the jar lid.
      • 2. Sir the Epsom salts into the water.     
      • 3. Pour the salt\water solution into the lid. Let stand for 24 hours.
      • 4. The next day, enjoy observing the crystal patterns on the black paper.


Here's the list of resources:

  • Fancy Nancy Books with Science Themes:
  • Fancy Nancy: Explorer Extraordinaire
  • Fancy Nancy: Stellar Stargazer
  • Fancy Nancy Sees Stars
  • Fancy Nancy: Every Day is Earth Day
  • Fancy Nancy Poison Ivy Expert
  • Fancy Nancy and the Posh Puppy

Science Activity Books to Enjoy with an Adult:

  • Beachcombing by Jim Arnosky
  • Field Trips by Jim Arnosky
  • The Brook Book by Jim Arnosky
  • Rainy Day Magic by Joey Green
  • Science Play! by Jill Hauser
  • Science Arts: Discovering Science through Art Experiences by MaryAnn Kohl
  • Zoom: Nature
  • The Five Minute Parent by Deborah Shelton: Chapter 3: "Weird & Wacky Science Experiments"
  • Janice VanCleave's Big Book of Play and Find Out Science Projects by Janice VanCleave

Websites (Always explore the internet under the supervision of a trusted adult):

          Zoom Science:

          An Official NASA Website for Grades K-4:

          Coloring pages, activities, and information on wild flowers from the US Forest Service:

 

 

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